For the entirety of 2017, every baby born at the Pittsburgh Midwife Center, St. Clair Hospital and UPMC Mercy will begin life as an art collector. Each month in 2017 is assigned to a local artist who will create an image that will only be given to babies born in that month. To view the artists' websites, please click on their name. 

June: Lori Hepner

Paddle #0092, Yukon River, Canada by Lori Hepner

Paddle #0092, Yukon River, Canada by Lori Hepner

I am an interdisciplinary artist working primarily in conceptually based photography, LED device artworks, as well as curating exploratory journeys for artists & explorers through a new outdoors program, RiverRouteResidency.com. I have shown my work in museums and galleries across the US and the world, including ones in New York, Houston, Finland, Spain, the United Kingdom, China, Canada, and also (later in 2017) the Moon! I grew up in Carrick, have a studio in Lawrenceville, teach at Penn State Greater Allegheny, and live in Brighton Heights. Visit www.LoriHepner.com to see more of my work!

Paddle #0098, #0089, #0092, and #0086 are four photos that I created using a 6-foot tall, computerized LED lights stick, that plays back my landscape photographs from my Arctic adventures. This sequence of photos visualized a part of a ruin of a log cabin that we found while canoeing the Yukon River last summer. I took traditional photographs of the landscapes during the trip and then loaded negative versions of them into my light stick back in my studio. I then moved myself (and the lights) around in front of the camera for 10s at a time while trying to re-enact body movements from paddling, hiking, and walking in the Yukon last summer.

May: Barbara Luderowski

Untitled by Barbara Luderowski

Untitled by Barbara Luderowski

Barbara is a Co-Director of the Mattress Factory—a museum that she founded in 1977. She studied at the Art Students League in New York, Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan and Carnegie Tech. She has exhibited her sculpture throughout the United States and her work is included in the collection of the University of Pittsburgh, Westinghouse Corporation, and the Wadsworth Atheneum. If you would like to find out more about Barbara, the Mattress Factory, and its 40th Anniversary, please visit www.mattress.org.

This photomontage was created by Barbara using teddy bears, puppets, dolls, and toys from her personal collection that she displays in her home atop the Mattress Factory. While she grew up with some of these toys, she has found many others at flea markets, auctions, and yard sales. She particularly enjoys finding broken toys and dolls that she can then repair herself. She prefers to see these toys as her diary—each piece has its own story and history and they all combine to tell a new story. She hopes that each of you will find as much happiness in your own toys, stuffed animals, and dolls as she has with these.

April: Annie O'Neill

The Future by Annie O'Neill

The Future by Annie O'Neill

After attending the University of Missouri for a bachelors degree, Annie O'Neill,  received a fiery baptism into professional journalism at The Detroit News, where she worked for two years before joining the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette as a staff photographer in 1995. Her accomplishments in documenting news and other human activity have been recognized by the National Press Photographers Association, Golden Quills, and Society of Newspaper Design. She’s thrice been named Pittsburgh Photographer of the year and twice been named Pennsylvania  Photographer of the year. She is the author of Unquiet Ruin - a Photographic Excavation and is working on her second book, The Gift of Work. She was the Ohio University Knight Fellow in 2003/04. She left the world of newspapers to be an independent photographer in 2008. Her clients include: The Heinz Endowments, Cleveland Clinic, LISC, University of Pittsburgh,  Landesberg Design, Community College of Allegheny County, Chatham University, The Heinz History Center,  Documentary Works, and UMPC. 

The Future is a photograph of my wife, Nancy,  and her sister, Sarah,  while they mulled over plans of the future. We took a moment to rest during a walk at a nature reserve near her sister’s house in Virginia. Even before we were actually in the park it felt like a special place from a distance. I was thinking I should have had my “real” camera. But I had my phone and was able to get two frames of this scene before the phone battery quit. It was not until later that night I saw this frame. It’s become one of my favorite photos. Not only because I feel it has a lovely quality but because Nancy and Sarah are very close and it’s a wonderful fact to share with the world. 

In the foreground, a bench facing away from us toward a field of yellow grass and a line of trees beyond, their leaves rich red and yellow. A person with gray hair sits on the left side of the bench; perhaps it is the husband of the woman with shoulder-length gray hair facing left, who walks along the front beam of the three dark-wooden beams that enclose the bench and the brown, bare earth around it. Four small trees gather near the bench enclosure. The woman, frozen in mid-step, looks almost as if she’s walking on the back of the bench toward her companion.

Mother and Child by Alisha B. Wormsley

Mother and Child by Alisha B. Wormsley

March: Alisha B. Wormsley

Alisha B. Wormsley is a community-oriented interdisciplinary artist and cultural producer. She has been honored with a number of awards and grants including the Mayor’s Public Art Award for the Homewood Artist Residency, There Are Black People in the Future body of work, and her collaboration with performance artist and opera singer, Lisa Harris. Right now, she is designing art for parks in the Hill District and Larimer. Please visit www.alishabwormsley.com to see more of her work!

This photo-montage belongs to a series called For Autistic Black Boys Who Are TOO Curious. This work is inspired by my experience with my nephew and godson who are both autistic and began with my nephew, who has one of the most artistic and beautiful ways of seeing the world. When he was very young I spent a lot of time with him in wonder of the worlds he resided in. I watched, related, and envied his ability to stay in them and the positive and negative effects it had on him and my family. When he was little I read Curious George to him—one of my favorite childhood characters. This work is my attempt to play around in these imaginary worlds while also drawing more serious connections between imperialism and colonialism.

Two red, mask-like faces stare directly at the viewer: a mother with a child on her lap. Their bodies are suggested by very roughly painted areas, the mother’s, blue, the child in front of her, brown. The faces are distorted, composed of large areas of red, orange, and pink interspersed with snipped-out parts of photos: a child’s mouth and chin and part of a nose, a large left eye and a smaller right one; both of the child’s eyes have black markings around them, suggesting brows and lower lashes; a series of black lines below the child’s left eye suggests the contours of its cheek. The mother’s face is less distorted than the child’s but also contains snippets of photographs: her nose and mouth, left eye and eyebrow. Her right eye is a black circle, giving her gaze a fixed, eerie quality; the right eye has a white oval drawn around it; the white line of the oval descends, suggesting the line of her nose. The child’s hands are fragments of photos: small hands grasping its belly-skin. In their lap, at the bottom right of the picture, part of the children’s book Where the Wild Things Are can be seen upside-down. Behind the mother and child, panels of different colors: upright directly behind, but to the left, at odd angles: one panel roughly painted greenish-yellow, a couple of panels with different shades of green-blue, other panels of black, brown, and a single, mottled panel of lighter tones reveals a vague figure resembling a cartoonish yellow fox with orange duck-feet. In the top left corner, a blue panel with broad leaves roughly drawn in black.

February: Deanna Mance

Earth Prime by Deanna Mance

Earth Prime by Deanna Mance

Deanna Mance is a self-taught artist whose work has been exhibited at venues including the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Bankside Gallery in London, U.K., and the Carnegie Museum of Art. She has been awarded the "Aaronel Deroy Gruber Award" and "Friends of Art" for Pittsburgh Public Schools at the Carnegie Museum of Art, and received "Best of Show" at the Three Rivers Arts Festival in 2010. In 2016, she created one of the first asphalt street murals in Pittsburgh titled City Composition. Located on Strawberry Way, City Composition was awarded "Best Street Transformation: People's Choice" by USA StreetBlog in 2016. She is also the co-founder of an alternative art gallery space, Gold Mine, in collaboration with David Oresick. She lives and works in Polish Hill. 

My work explores the interplay of the conscious and subconscious, and the relationship between nature and human experience. I use freehand techniques and spontaneous mark making as a tool that allows the work to build and grow without the restrictions of self awareness or premeditation. Through this approach, I embrace the unpredictable qualities and uncertain outcomes of my work. The aesthetic of my work reflects my interests in the passage of time, overlooked details in the everyday and my compulsion towards repetition. Part of my practice includes salvaging found materials that either become integrated within the art making or collected as a source of inspiration. I am creatively fueled by the constraints of limited materials and the act of improvisation throughout my process. 

To see more of her work, please visit www.deannamance.com

The bottom half of the frame contains a large mass that suggests a cresting ocean wave or part of a mountain-range; the mass doesn’t quite reach either the right or left side of the frame; beyond, the background is light gray. From the right, the wave rises from a mottled brown, to light gray at the top of the crest, to a black richly flecked with gold, green, and white on the left. Partway up the crest, an irregular, white-and-pink shape descends; its interior is marked with fine geometric shapes, ornate and indecipherable. Above the wave and occupying most of the remaining space, a bulbous shape rises: close to the wave, it’s dark yellow, verging on orange, but as it rises, it shifts to salmon. A ribbon of black rises from near the top of the crest through the bulb toward the left side of the frame; squiggles and dots inside the ribbon reveal the yellow and salmon colors beneath. Near the top center of the bulb, four roughly drawn yellow circles enclose four smaller circles the color of fried eggs—orange in the middle, white at the edges. A rough semi-circular red line links the bulb to the crest of the wave below, and other black lines, two solid, two dotted, and several other squiggles of yellow, red, black, and yellow decorate the bulb. Between the crest and the bulb, two masses of black dots, one to the left, one to the right, suggest flocks of birds in flight over mountains.

 

January: Rose Clancy

It's a Beautiful Day by Rose Clancy

Rose Clancy creates site-specific art installations and assemblage sculptures that comment on abuses human beings inflict upon one another, and upon the nature environment in which they live. Her work focuses on the relationship between neglect and nurturing, and explores internal and external transformations that occur within the process of healing and recovery from injury.

In an ongoing project, titled Dangerous Objects Made Safe, Rose creates time-based sculptures comprised of hundreds of dangerous rusty objects, each individually wrapped in white cotton fabric. The sculptures are situated in outdoor settings where they are exposed to repeated soakings of rainfall over a period of several months. During this period, iron oxide leaches from the rusty objects and is absorbed into the fabric wrappings, transforming the sculpture’s outward appearance from pristine white to a rich color palette of rusty yellows, oranges, and browns. At the close of each iteration of the project, the sculpture is dismantled and the encapsulated objects are unwrapped to reveal beautifully abstracted rust-stained fabric, full of marks of transformation.

To see more of Rose Clancy’s work please visit www.roseclancy.com 

A line divides the picture into two parts; it starts halfway up the left side of the frame and slants upward at an angle of perhaps twenty degrees to just below the upper right-hand corner. The part below the slanting line—three-quarters of the picture—looks like mother-of-pearl, the inside of an oyster shell, seen through a microscope: light gray and yellow surfaces mottled with dark spots, some of the spots elongated like microscopic worms, others like growth cells. Dark, wavy lines form spiky, irregular crescents, one intruding from the right, another bubbling up from the bottom left. At the nucleus of each intruding crescent, dark stains. At the top quarter of the picture, what looks like a half sun, reddish-yellow, peers over the slanting line, shooting rays of reddish-yellow that grow brighter as they reach toward the left side of the frame.